Can You Eat Celery Seed? Top 5 Celery Seed Benefits

Can You Eat Celery Seed? Top 5 Celery Seed Benefits

This tiny miracle seed comes straight from a celery plant called smallage but cannot be harvested until the second year of development. The celery plant produces a valuable celery seed essential oil, which is often used in the perfume industry — and which also contains a powerful chemical compound called apiole. Celery seeds are well-known in cooking as a spice, both whole and ground, which do more than just add flavor to dishes — they also have amazing effects on health. Used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat colds, flu, water retention, poor digestion, arthritis, and disease, celery seed has been part of holistic health for thousands of years. What is it used for today? It’s commonly used to help the body eliminate water through urine, treat arthritis and gout, reduce menstrual cramps, decrease inflammation, and lower blood pressure.

Celery Seed Benefits

  1. Helps Regulate Blood Pressure
  2. Offers Antiseptic Properties to Help Preserve Food
  3. Can Alleviate Symptoms of Arthritis and Gout
  4. Offers Antibacterial Benefits and Fights Infection
  5. May Help Reduce Pain Associated with Menstrual Cramps

    1. Helps Regulate Blood Pressure

    According to a study conducted at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in Iran performed on rats, the effects of different celery seed extracts on blood pressure may offer positive results.

    In the study, blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in rat subjects that were administered celery seed extracts. The results indicate that the extract helped lower blood pressure. It also increased heart rate in hypertensive rats. Ultimately, researchers concluded that celery seed extract offers antihypertensive properties and therefore could benefit those struggling with bloodcelery juice has many benefits pressure regulation and can ultimately help lower blood pressure.

    2. Offers Antiseptic Properties to Help Preserve Food

    If an all-natural preservative exists, why not use it instead of unhealthy options? Celery seed may be the perfect answer. India is one country that knows this all too well since people in India have been using this spice, among others, for hundreds, if not thousands, of years to preserve food.

    The University College of Science’s Department of Biochemistry in India analyzed 35 common Indian spices. Among the spices researchers surveyed were celery, clove, cinnamon, bishop’s weed, chili, horseradish, cumin, tamarind, black cumin, pomegranate seeds, nutmeg, garlic, onion and tejpat.

    What researchers found was that these common Indian spices “have potent antimicrobial activities against the test organisms Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633), Escherichia coli (ATCC 10536) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ATCC 976